Way Down South

I mentioned the nerves, but bundled in among them is a serious jag of excitement, not least due to the increasing number of books sales, pre-orders and ratings from Australia.

That settles it, I have to have an Australian character in book three: The Shaman’s House.

Book three is already well under way, building to a serious climax in The Greenland Trilogy.

Stay tuned, mate!

Into the Black

Today is a good day. There have been many good days on this indie author’s journey, but today is especially good as I have now – according to my budget – moved out of the red and into the black! I have now earned back the money I have paid for covers and promotion, and am now a colossal £7 or $10 richer! Of course, after Danish tax, that means about £3.50 or $5 richer, enough for a coffee without cream. But the journey to this point has been wild. And it’s the journey that counts!

So what’s next?

Well, it’s not like I don’t have any plans, but for this moment anyway, it’s time to kick back and enjoy the coffee – without cream – and dream of distant peaks, and icy summits, for the climb is what it is all about, summitting is just the moment when every step on the journey comes together.

I have a lot of steps left as an indie author, it’s time to gear-up!

Curious about that “next step”? I’ll be sure to post more information soon, but until then, you might be interested to pick up a cheap pre-order of book two in the Greenland Trilogy. In the Shadow of the Mountain is available from Amazon for kindle books and apps.

Amazon USA

Amazon UK

Amazon Australia

Amazon Canada

A Writing Nook and Nuuk

It’s been quiet around here for a little while now, and with good reason. After many years of rented accommodation, Jane and I finally bought a house. We’re moved in, but we’re still moving in, if you know what I mean. This whole settling process is going to take time, and yet, for once, time is what we have, heaps of it. So the cellar can wait, we can navigate around the kitchen, the floors have been sanded and soaped, and the writing room – the writing nook – does not need to be ready today, tomorrow, or even three months from now, just so long as it exists, that’s enough.

During the course of my studies, I researched writing, lived on anecdotes and sage advice from authors. I rejected the concept of choosing a specific time of day and place to write, choosing instead to follow the idea of getting words on the page, whenever and wherever you can. It worked for me, and it still does, which begs the question: why do I even need a writing nook?

I can’t answer that.

But I think it has something to do with knowing that there is a space that I can retreat to, if need be. I have written a lot of words in libraries, hiding in plain sight in the afternoons, at kitchen tables, early in the morning when everyone else is sleeping, and in the armchair, late at night, when the house is still and the dust settling. I don’t need the writing space, but for the first time ever I have one.

It is a space, hardly a nook, but thoughts of Nuuk, the capital of Greenland, invade it as I follow Fenna through part 2 of book 2: In the Shadow of the Mountain. It’s going well, she is surprising – ad-libbing and deviating from the storybeats. After the events in the first half of the book, I need to give her some leeway, and I figure that, by now, she knows what she is doing. I just need to relax, and let her get on with the story, telling it her way, with a few descriptions and comments from me once in a while.

As for now. It’s back to my nook.

The Sands of Sacrifice

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I am not the only writer with a “good luck tradition”, but I might be one of the few where the tradition can potentially lead to the complete destruction of the manuscript. When I have my final rough draft I stick it in my backpack and drive to the beach. The West Coast of Denmark has one long, broad, fantastic beach, with plenty of waves. The tradition involves tossing the manuscript onto the sand at the surf line and grabbing it before the waves surge onto the beach. If I manage to get it before it is sucked out to sea, then I presume the story to be good enough to edit. If I get wet, and a struggle ensues, then I know that I am invested in the story, and will do what it takes to get it ready for publication.

It took me about three and a half years to reach the point where I was ready to toss The Ice Star into the sea, I am pleased to say it only took a few seconds to decide to grab it!

If you’re curious to know more, feel free to sign-up for the newsletter here.

If you just want to sample the book, you can find it on Amazon:

Amazon USA

Amazon UK

Amazon Australia

Amazon Canada