Way Down South

I mentioned the nerves, but bundled in among them is a serious jag of excitement, not least due to the increasing number of books sales, pre-orders and ratings from Australia.

That settles it, I have to have an Australian character in book three: The Shaman’s House.

Book three is already well under way, building to a serious climax in The Greenland Trilogy.

Stay tuned, mate!

A Smorgasbord of Nerves

Fenna scrabbled to her feet and kicked the Gunnery Sergeant in the groin. He moaned, she kicked him again in the head, and then, a third time, planting the sole of her size five desert boots in the centre of his chest. She ignored the Gunnery Sergeant and collected her equipment, slipping her arms through the straps of the empty hydration pack, closing her notepad and stuffing it into the cargo pocket of her trousers, before pushing the rubber caps over the ends of the scope and slinging the rifle over her shoulder. The evening chill descended quickly, cooling the sweat on her back. She tugged a buff from her trouser pocket and slipped it over her neck. She took one last look at the Gunnery Sergeant and took a breath. It was time to move.

This is it then, book two in The Greenland Trilogy is less than a month from release, doing well in the pre-sales, and serving up a smorgasbord of nerves – for the author, anyway.

In book two, Fenna is plagued by demons from the past, but, at the same time, she must confront new adversaries like the USMC Gunnery Sergeant, above.

There is plenty of intrigue to offset the action in book two, but, I will admit, it gets a little rough at times, and, in Greenland, anything goes.

Curious? Then, you might be interested to pick up a cheap pre-order of In the Shadow of the Mountain, available from Amazon for kindle books and apps. The paperback will be available to buy on the date of publication: August 1st.

Amazon USA

Amazon UK

Amazon Australia

Amazon Canada

 

And now it’s gone

Jane and I visited Nuugaatsiaq (photo: 2008) in July and August 2008, while living and working in Uummannaq, Greenland. Now, almost nine years later, much of what we saw, and even some of the people we met, is gone. A tsunami crashed into the settlement on the 18th June, bringing tragedy to one of Greenland’s prettiest and most exciting areas. It’s hard to imagine how people are coping, and suddenly, a place that is very dear to me, is very far away indeed.

My thoughts go out to the people of Nuugaatsiaq, and Uummannaq fjord.

It is possible to help through donations coordinated via the Bank of Greenland (follow link for the Danish page.)