Seaweed & Secrets

Seven Graves One Winter is set in the settlement of Inussuk on the west coast of Greenland. Inussuk doesn’t exist, but the strange pieces of art shaped and crafted from seaweed, bones, skulls, pebbles, and sinew do, or at least they did when I visited “Inussuk” in 2010. 

As I write in the book, it wouldn’t take much of a detective to locate the real Inussuk on the map in Uummannaq fjord, but I like the fact that the location of the settlement is a little mysterious, hidden for a while. But I will never forget the people I met, the sound of the surf breaking on the black sand beach, and the fin whales passing by as I was treated to coffee in the artist’s house.

All the characters in my books about Greenland are fictitious, but each of them share a common grounding in Greenland, the country, and its people.

The Heart that was a Wild Garden

I’m having fun with this one – imagining Constable David Maratse as a parent. There’s a lot of sadness and hope in The Heart that was a Wild Garden, it even starts with a funeral. But the themes are relevant, and, without giving too much away, I’ve experienced elements of this story in Greenland, to varying degrees.

The Heart that was a Wild Garden is available from Amazon for pre-order, and is due for release in October. It is the 5th in the series of Greenland short stories featuring Maratse, but it is set way into the future.

You can find it here:

USAUKCanada, and Australia

And get the bigger picture here:

A Cold Binge

I’ve had a few mails about which books to read in what order.

Confession time – I turned to Goodreads to figure it out.

If we stick with Greenland and the Arctic, then thriller readers looking for a bit more action should definitely start with The Ice Star. It’s here that we meet Constable David Maratse for the first time. However, crime readers who are looking for an alternative – read “cold” – setting, should perhaps start with Seven Graves One Winter, although, and this is where it gets a little tricky, there are, currently, four short stories that are set prior to the events in Seven Graves One Winter, and The Ice Star for that matter.

Readers don’t need to read any of the short stories (Katabatic, Container, Tupilaq, or The Last Flight) to enjoy Seven Graves One Winter, nor do they need to read The Ice Star. But, the definitive reading order – as of July 2018 – would be this:

Of course, that’s not all the books – either planned or written.

Confused? Don’t be. Goodreads can help, and give you an idea if you even want to begin. 😉 ‘Cos it ain’t over yet.

Don’t blink!

There are moments when something that you know is short-lived and not necessarily completely reliable never fail to please. So, when Piteraq popped into the number one spot of the New Releases in World Literature Short Stories on Amazon US, well… it was fun. Now, it’s not the most competitive category, it looked good.

It’s gone now.

All over.

But for one moment at least, Oversergent Mikael Gregersen’s short story about his first year with the Danish Sirius Sledge Patrol in Greenland topped the charts. One of the typical comments about The Ice Star is – semi-spoiler alert – how little Gregersen featured in the story. I mean, the man is a – fictive – Sirius legend! I had always planned to follow up on what happened to Mikael during his first year as a fup in Greenland. This is that story, and it’s available for pre-order on

Amazon USA, UK, Canada, and Australia

Here’s a bigger photo of the cover…

And one more, even bigger, ‘cos it’s an epic kinda story!

The cover photo – spoiler alert – is from Qaanaaq, and not the Northeast coast of Greenland.

Gotta love Greenland!

Just received an email from a reader, traveller, photographer who has just finished reading The Greenland Trilogy. It never fails to have an impact when I hear from readers who have enjoyed my books. Of course, when they are also mad about Greenland, and have been there… well, it just gets better and better.

Be sure to check out Lisa Germany’s website for her amazing photos from Greenland and other exciting places around the world.

Blink and you’ll miss it!

I couldn’t resist fiddling with the cover of Seven Graves, One Winter, mostly because I like the cover for Blood Floe. Does it make a difference? Nah, probably not, but I like it, but it really is a case of blink and you’ll miss it. Of course, if that’s the case, you’ll have to keep your eyes shut tight to miss the larger version of the cover. 😉

So what’s going on? Why the subtle(ish) changes in the cover, and why… just why? Well, book 2 in the Greenland Crime Series is so very nearly ready to be released or unleashed on the world. That’s why. 🙂

Blood Floe is still available at a crazy pre-order price here, on Amazon:

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Iceland Noir

I’m heading north again – this time it’s Iceland, in November!

I’m really excited about going to Iceland Noir, and sitting on a panel of authors. I have zero, and I mean zero idea about what that means, but hey, when in Iceland! I always thought I might land there one day, and actually hoped a few times to be diverted when flying through bad weather in Greenland, but Air Greenland pilots are pretty good, damnit! 🙂

Anyway, that’s it for news just now. Just had to share.

Withdrawal Symptoms!

I confess, this song was my ringtone for about 4 years! The song is called Seqinitta Qinngorpaatit and the band is Nanook. At one point I taught the new drummer when I was teaching at the A level college in Nuuk, Greenland’s capital.

I don’t know if this is throwback Thursday, but it is a great song.

Find out more about Nanook here.

The Blood is Floeing

Here’s a teaser, the opening paragraph from Blood Floe.

Even in the unfathomable dark of the polar winter there is always light. The moon reflecting on the surface of the sea ice, the green and white curtains of the Northern Lights twisting across the black night sky, the stars, pinpricks of light scrutinising the tiny villages and settlements dotted along the west coast of Greenland, the houses casting warm yellow squares onto the snow through thick-paned windows, the tiny red lights of the radio mast glowing above the graveyard on the mountain’s knee above the settlement of Inussuk, and a cigarette burning a bright orange, a smouldering flame just a few centimetres from the lips of the man wearing a headlamp, that he shined with slow drifts of his head to the left and right, as he searched for that damned dog that shunned the harness and refused to be trained.

Available for pre-order at just 0.99 from Amazon

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