Blink and you’ll miss it!

I couldn’t resist fiddling with the cover of Seven Graves, One Winter, mostly because I like the cover for Blood Floe. Does it make a difference? Nah, probably not, but I like it, but it really is a case of blink and you’ll miss it. Of course, if that’s the case, you’ll have to keep your eyes shut tight to miss the larger version of the cover. 😉

So what’s going on? Why the subtle(ish) changes in the cover, and why… just why? Well, book 2 in the Greenland Crime Series is so very nearly ready to be released or unleashed on the world. That’s why. 🙂

Blood Floe is still available at a crazy pre-order price here, on Amazon:

USA, UK, Canada, and Australia

Iceland Noir

I’m heading north again – this time it’s Iceland, in November!

I’m really excited about going to Iceland Noir, and sitting on a panel of authors. I have zero, and I mean zero idea about what that means, but hey, when in Iceland! I always thought I might land there one day, and actually hoped a few times to be diverted when flying through bad weather in Greenland, but Air Greenland pilots are pretty good, damnit! 🙂

Anyway, that’s it for news just now. Just had to share.

Withdrawal Symptoms!

I confess, this song was my ringtone for about 4 years! The song is called Seqinitta Qinngorpaatit and the band is Nanook. At one point I taught the new drummer when I was teaching at the A level college in Nuuk, Greenland’s capital.

I don’t know if this is throwback Thursday, but it is a great song.

Find out more about Nanook here.

The Blood is Floeing

Here’s a teaser, the opening paragraph from Blood Floe.

Even in the unfathomable dark of the polar winter there is always light. The moon reflecting on the surface of the sea ice, the green and white curtains of the Northern Lights twisting across the black night sky, the stars, pinpricks of light scrutinising the tiny villages and settlements dotted along the west coast of Greenland, the houses casting warm yellow squares onto the snow through thick-paned windows, the tiny red lights of the radio mast glowing above the graveyard on the mountain’s knee above the settlement of Inussuk, and a cigarette burning a bright orange, a smouldering flame just a few centimetres from the lips of the man wearing a headlamp, that he shined with slow drifts of his head to the left and right, as he searched for that damned dog that shunned the harness and refused to be trained.

Available for pre-order at just 0.99 from Amazon

USA, UK, Canada, and Australia

Arctic Noir: The Icelanders

I love the cover for Yrsa Sigurðardóttir’s book DNA. There are variations with all but the titles blacked-out somehow, but the gaffa tape is inspired. Truly.

I met Yrsa at the Horsens Crime Festival, gave her a copy of Seven Graves One Winter – see earlier post for the #shortageofbooks – and told her that I just had to say “hi” as her books, and the other Icelandic crime authors’ books, help sell my own. I find that I am regularly placed on Amazon beside the Icelanders, and I can’t think of better company.

I flew over Iceland a lot when I lived in Greenland, sometimes flying high to beat the ash from the volcanoes, but I never set foot on Iceland, something I really need to do something about.

It was great to talk to Yrsa. She is a talented and passionate author determined to find interesting ways to bump people off. I mean, what’s not to like? I look forward to reading more of her books, and wish her well with both old and new books, not least because they are good for business.

You can find out more about Yrsa Sigurðardóttir on her Facebook page.

Arctic Noir: The Danes

I’m still processing what I learned, who I met, and what I experienced at the Horsens Crime Festival. However, of the many authors I met, there are two in particular that I must mention, as we write within the same genre that could be described as Arctic Noir.

I listened to Nina von Staffeldt talk on the stage on Sunday. It was clear that she has a lot of experience of and a lot of love for Greenland, the country, and, not least, its people. I can relate. Nina talked about the ordinary Greenlander, not the stereotype one hears about in the media. She has made a point of writing about strong Greenlandic characters, and I fully applaud her doing so, and look forward to reading her books Frozen Evidence and The Black Angel featuring the character of Sika Haslund. The books are currently only available in Danish – as is her website. But do have a look, and watch out for the English translation – I am sure it will be in the works.

After Nina’s talk, I had the chance to meet her, and took the opportunity to give her a copy of Seven Graves, One Winter. Now I am waiting on her books from the library. I’ll be sure to write more when I read them.

I’ll be back with another short post about Yrsa Sigurðardóttir, who I was also fortunate to chat to at the festival. When Yrsa sells books, I sell books, and I had the chance to thank her for that… and give her a copy of my book.

You see the pattern here, don’t you? Talk to someone, give them a book.

Gonna need some more books!

Sifting through Blood

Constable (ret.) David Maratse can be a bit of a problem, and I thought I would take a moment to explain.

While Maratse does feature in the Arctic thriller The Ice Star, he also has his own series – two, in fact.

The Greenland Crime series, of which Blood Floe is book 2, are full-length crime novels.

The Arctic Shorts, of which The Last Flight is the fourth story in the series, are short stories set prior to the events in the Greenland Crime series. They are typically 15,000 words or a little over 50 pages each. The Arctic Shorts are crime with a Jack London-like feel. You’ve been warned. 😉

Both Blood Floe and The Last Flight are available for pre-order on Amazon.

Blood Floe USA, UK, Canada, and Australia

The Last Flight USA, UK, Canada and Australia

I hope that helps.

Cold Research

I write about a lot of things in my stories about which I have thankfully no experience, but there are some things I have done, and when I write about them I have a wealth of memories to inspire me. I had a team of dogs in Greenland, and, while it may have taken us a few years, we finally found our sledging mojo and made some tracks on the sea ice. We had plenty of misadventures too, but always got home safely, even in the dark.

The dogs were built for the Arctic, but I wasn’t. Every day was a learning curve. But I do miss it, and I miss my dogs. Who knows, maybe one day I’ll have a team again. Until then, I’ll keep writing.

January Updates

I have finished updating the webpage – for today at least. I will add content and generally fiddle with the pages through the course of the year. The main changes reflect a focus on writing and being an author. They include:

An EVENTS page with a calendar of dates when I will be speaking, reading, or just generally hanging out in person.

I have added a READS page, and I intend to mention some of the key polar books that have inspired me as a reader, writer, and adventurer (of sorts).

I have also tried to distinguish between works of FICTION and NONFICTION.

That’s it for now. I’ll leave you with a photo of Uummannaq in January. The yellow building in the centre is the hospital, and figures heavily in The Ice Star.

And… here’s a puppy!

Didn’t expect a puppy, did you? Well, I am really trying to sort out the website, so there’s a lot of pages coming and going, so why not a puppy?

This is Hidalgo. He grew up fast, but there was a time when he and his brother – Balto – were two fat things that couldn’t put their legs on the ground for all the milk they had been drinking from their mother – Simba.

Yeah, Simba was a girl, in a strange what-just-happened Disney throwback. In other words, I didn’t name her, but a Lion King loving Greenlander did. Balto was given his name by a girl in Denmark. Hidalgo – yeah, that one’s on me.

So, I’ll leave you with a puppy while I make more mischief here on the page.

Cute, isn’t he?