Puncture Wounds

Today I was bitten by a dog.

It’s been a while.

It was the neighbour’s dog, and, well, what’s a puncture wound or two between friends? But I have thought about it since. I thought I did everything right. I had gloves on, I removed one, and when the dog approached – barking, I stood still and let him sniff and lick my fingers.

So far so good.

I let him lead me to his master. I followed. Only when I was done talking, and started walking back off the property, did the little bugger sneak up and bite me behind the knee.

Puncture wound.

Singular.

The last time was a full on scrap, out on the sea ice, with dogs at the end of ganglines, fur, teeth, and claw. In my inferior wisdom and with a colossal lack of judgement, I waded in – empty-handed. But, I now have a wonderful tattoo on my right arm – Vitus’ teeth in a half crescent.

Puncture wounds.

Plural.

The Shaman’s House

In the eyes of the Danish government, Konstabel Fenna Brongaard has switched sides and gone rogue. The collateral damage she left in her wake in Greenland’s capital, Nuuk, has been brushed away by a shadowy figure known as The Magician. In return for his assistance, Fenna is tasked with entering the United States in the wake of a Presidential assassination, with one clear goal: to apprehend the assassin. As her list of allies grows thin, Fenna teams up with the man responsible for the death of her Sirius Patrol partner. Together, they must get the assassin out of North America and to a safe house in a remote country. Fenna knows the end game is in sight, and, if she is to survive it, she needs to choose the terrain and the location.

She chooses Greenland.

She chooses the Shaman’s House.

The stakes are higher, the action more intense, and the environment raw, wild, and lethal.

The final installment in the Greenland Trilogy is now available for pre-order at a special pre-order price.

Amazon USA

Amazon UK

Amazon Australia

Amazon Canada

The Container

Greenland Police Constable David Maratse makes his solo debut in a short story – Katabatic – set in the Arctic, very soon. But he’s going to be busy this Fall as he returns in a second short called Container.

So what’s the deal with all these Arctic Shorts? Well, Maratse and I have a deal, we need to get to know each other before he hits the crime scene with a vengeance in 2018. You see, Maratse and I have a plan: to put Greenland firmly on the crime map without translation – yes, Greenland crime written in English from the get go!

Curious to see how Maratse shapes up in the early days before he gets assigned to a more permanent post? You can find him in books one and two of The Greenland Trilogy, and in the above mentioned shorts.

You can find Container on Amazon here:

Amazon USA

Amazon UK

Amazon Australia

Amazon Canada

Time in Australia RIGHT NOW

Following The Ice Star down under, I find myself regularly asking Google what time it is in Australia “right now”. And right now, The Ice Star is moving up the charts for International Mystery and Crime on Amazon.

So, as a crazy thank you to the sudden boost in readers taking a chance on my book, I dug around for an Aussie song from my childhood… I was 10 at the time. Right now, well, I’m a little older.

Thanks again to Aussie readers! Have a great day/evening.

Katabatic!

Sometimes called “fall winds” (wikipedia) catabatic winds are common in Greenland. Fittingly, this fall, I will be releasing my first Arctic Short with the title Katabatic.

In Police Constable David Maratse’s first solo outing, set some time prior to the events in The Ice Star, I will be exploring the tragic themes of shame and suicide through a journalist’s narrative documenting the pursuit of a hunter who murdered his brother in a drunken brawl.

Is that Noir enough for you? Then be sure to check it out, and maybe even pre-order it.

The official release date is October 23rd, 2017. Until then, Katabatic is available for pre-order on Amazon kindles and tablets, and other devices with the Amazon app.

Amazon USA

Amazon UK

Amazon Australia

Amazon Canada

Adventurous Spines

A lot of books get an awful lot of abuse, but the best-loved and most abused, in my opinion, are the ones squeezed onto hastily-erected shelves in frostbitten huts plunged into darkness for three to four months each year. The Ice Star has yet to join the hallowed spines of polar greats, but it is on its way to the Arctic, in the library of an Aurora Expeditions adventure cruise ship – they just posted about it on their Facebook page.

I have discovered interesting books in remote cabins in the far north of Greenland, Canada, and Alaska. Tracing a finger down the cracked and splintered spine of a much-read, and much-abused book evokes a sense of adventure for it takes an adventurous spirit to reach such cabins in the wilds.

In the same way that frost can often eat into a book in a remote cabin, books can eat into the miles taken to reach such places. When the stove is burning, your wool socks are thawing on the line looped between the rafters, and you’re kicking back in a bruised-wood chair, a sleeping bag wrapped around your knees, a cup of cocoa in one hand and a book in the other, well … you get the picture. There’s nothing better after a long trek, paddle, climb, or ski than following the path of another adventurer through the pages of a book.

I plan on sending more books into the wilds, perhaps you’ll find one someday.

Photo of Shackleton’s bookshelf from The Smithsonian.