Blink and you’ll miss it!

I couldn’t resist fiddling with the cover of Seven Graves, One Winter, mostly because I like the cover for Blood Floe. Does it make a difference? Nah, probably not, but I like it, but it really is a case of blink and you’ll miss it. Of course, if that’s the case, you’ll have to keep your eyes shut tight to miss the larger version of the cover. 😉

So what’s going on? Why the subtle(ish) changes in the cover, and why… just why? Well, book 2 in the Greenland Crime Series is so very nearly ready to be released or unleashed on the world. That’s why. 🙂

Blood Floe is still available at a crazy pre-order price here, on Amazon:

USA, UK, Canada, and Australia

The Blood is Floeing

Here’s a teaser, the opening paragraph from Blood Floe.

Even in the unfathomable dark of the polar winter there is always light. The moon reflecting on the surface of the sea ice, the green and white curtains of the Northern Lights twisting across the black night sky, the stars, pinpricks of light scrutinising the tiny villages and settlements dotted along the west coast of Greenland, the houses casting warm yellow squares onto the snow through thick-paned windows, the tiny red lights of the radio mast glowing above the graveyard on the mountain’s knee above the settlement of Inussuk, and a cigarette burning a bright orange, a smouldering flame just a few centimetres from the lips of the man wearing a headlamp, that he shined with slow drifts of his head to the left and right, as he searched for that damned dog that shunned the harness and refused to be trained.

Available for pre-order at just 0.99 from Amazon

USA, UK, Canada, and Australia

Arctic Noir: The Danes

I’m still processing what I learned, who I met, and what I experienced at the Horsens Crime Festival. However, of the many authors I met, there are two in particular that I must mention, as we write within the same genre that could be described as Arctic Noir.

I listened to Nina von Staffeldt talk on the stage on Sunday. It was clear that she has a lot of experience of and a lot of love for Greenland, the country, and, not least, its people. I can relate. Nina talked about the ordinary Greenlander, not the stereotype one hears about in the media. She has made a point of writing about strong Greenlandic characters, and I fully applaud her doing so, and look forward to reading her books Frozen Evidence and The Black Angel featuring the character of Sika Haslund. The books are currently only available in Danish – as is her website. But do have a look, and watch out for the English translation – I am sure it will be in the works.

After Nina’s talk, I had the chance to meet her, and took the opportunity to give her a copy of Seven Graves, One Winter. Now I am waiting on her books from the library. I’ll be sure to write more when I read them.

I’ll be back with another short post about Yrsa Sigurðardóttir, who I was also fortunate to chat to at the festival. When Yrsa sells books, I sell books, and I had the chance to thank her for that… and give her a copy of my book.

You see the pattern here, don’t you? Talk to someone, give them a book.

Gonna need some more books!

What’s in the box?

Se7en… it’s a classic. It always rains, and then that one day of sunshine. Well. There was this box, see. It wasn’t good. But it was good, the film, if you know what I mean? Anyway, see the film. Don’t look in the box.

Today I looked in the box.

It came exactly as planned according to the tracking number – and if that isn’t enough to make you suspicious … well.

I don’t know.

It was reasonably big, pretty heavy, taped so well I needed a knife, and loaded with cold cases – Arctic Noir!

Yep, it’s the Horsens Crime Festival #krimimessen this weekend, and I need something to decorate my tiny stand with, so I got hold of some books, and they just happen to be mine. Of course, with the table, the roll-up poster, flyers, business cards, and now a box load of books. Yeah, I’m gonna need a bigger boat stand. (I have to toss that line in as often as possible – sorry.)

And now?

Well, now I have an empty box…

…more later.

Sifting through Blood

Constable (ret.) David Maratse can be a bit of a problem, and I thought I would take a moment to explain.

While Maratse does feature in the Arctic thriller The Ice Star, he also has his own series – two, in fact.

The Greenland Crime series, of which Blood Floe is book 2, are full-length crime novels.

The Arctic Shorts, of which The Last Flight is the fourth story in the series, are short stories set prior to the events in the Greenland Crime series. They are typically 15,000 words or a little over 50 pages each. The Arctic Shorts are crime with a Jack London-like feel. You’ve been warned. 😉

Both Blood Floe and The Last Flight are available for pre-order on Amazon.

Blood Floe USA, UK, Canada, and Australia

The Last Flight USA, UK, Canada and Australia

I hope that helps.

Katabatic!

Sometimes called “fall winds” (wikipedia) catabatic winds are common in Greenland. Fittingly, this fall, I will be releasing my first Arctic Short with the title Katabatic.

In Police Constable David Maratse’s first solo outing, set some time prior to the events in The Ice Star, I will be exploring the tragic themes of shame and suicide through a journalist’s narrative documenting the pursuit of a hunter who murdered his brother in a drunken brawl.

Is that Noir enough for you? Then be sure to check it out, and maybe even pre-order it.

The official release date is October 23rd, 2017. Until then, Katabatic is available for pre-order on Amazon kindles and tablets, and other devices with the Amazon app.

Amazon USA

Amazon UK

Amazon Australia

Amazon Canada

Arctic Noir – it’s a thing!

It has been an interesting week with lots of things going on in the world of Greenlandic crime and thrillers. I was thrilled to see The Arctic Journal’s article about The Ice Star be tweeted on the Danish Embassy in Canada’s Twitter account. Of course, knowing what I do about the plot of The Ice Star (no spoilers here), there’s a few butterflies fluttering inside my stomach.

But the really exciting news has absolutely nothing to do with my book at all.

Mads Peder Nordbo, a Danish author living in Nuuk, Greenland, has just sold his crime book set in Greenland: The Girl without Skin, to 14 countries, for a 7 figure number (Danish kroner, I imagine). You can read about that in Politiken’s article (Danish). The gist of the article suggests that Greenland is hot right now, and it has nothing to do with Global Warming. While some in the literary world might believe that interest in Nordic Noir is waning, Arctic Noir might just be the next big thing.

Yep, you read it right, that’s Arctic Noir.

So, this is exciting in the sense that The Ice Star has come out at just the right time. The question now is how to make the most of it.