Sneak Preview

I am useless at keeping secrets, so here’s a sneak preview of the cover of Piteraq.

It’s “in development”, which means exactly that. If, like me, you were sad when a certain Sirius Sledge Patrol member was killed in The Ice Star, then you’re in luck – Oversergent Mikael Gregersen returns in Piteraq, a stand-alone novel set in Greenland’s High Arctic.

He won’t be the only character to get his own series after The Ice Star. Greenlandic policeman David Maratse returns with his own purely crime series in 2018. But, if you’re curious, you can find out more about his early career before he met Fenna in two short stories set in Greenland: Katabatic and Container – available later this year.

I know, I’m teasing, but if you like the north, the Arctic, stories about snow, storms, and survival, you’ll like Piteraq.

Bring me that Horizon

September, two years ago, this happened – I graduated with a writer’s degree. I started studying around the time of the publishing revolution that Amazon kick-started. I realised that my dreams of being a writer were not so far-fetched after all, but I wanted to qualify my writing with  a theoretical background, to create a solid foundation for my books. Two years later and I had done it. Now I just had to make some money. it turns out that that particular aspect was going to take a little longer … another two years. While I am nowhere near full-time, the potential is there, just on the horizon.

The purpose of this pat-on-the-back post is less about me (believe it or not) and more about dreams, working hard, and getting results. Amazon might have given me a means of getting around the gatekeepers (traditional publishers), and avoiding the pitfalls of agents, but I still need to put in the legwork – and so do you. 😉

If any wannabe authors happen to pass by this website, take heart, you can do it too. Put in the time and effort, and you will begin to see results, just don’t expect it to happen anytime soon. I guess that’s that why they call them dreams. So, without further ado, I’ll finish with a suitable Jack Sparrow quote:

Now … bring me that horizon.

Adventurous Spines: Slaven’s Roadhouse

Stayed two nights at Slaven’s Roadhouse. Received an incredibly warm welcome from Randy, Cindy, and Shaelyn. Amazing service in an amazing place. We started in Whitehorse and we’re on our way to Emmonak, as long as it’s safe and fun, we’ll keep paddling! We have two children in our party: Tiuri (9) and Liva (7), and the Rangers made them feel right at home. Keep up the excellent work – we appreciate it so much!
Best regards: Lars, Suzi, Tiuri, Liva, Jane and Chris
www.lifeisgoodfollowus.com

Slaven’s Roadhouse is a halfway house, a little patch of heaven in the Yukon Charley Rivers National Preserve. It was also our home for a couple of days and nights, time to recharge before pushing on deeper into Alaska. The Rangers were supercharged with humour, compassion and hospitality. They received us, our gear, and our kids with open arms. They were our heroes.

A little too dramatic for you?

Try a month on the Yukon River, through lightning, forest fires, heatwaves, rainstorms, and mud… lots of mud. Sure, we were having a great time, but a little home comfort was no small thing, and we found heaps of it at Slaven’s.

Slaven’s was also, for me, the culmination of a teenage dream. I had devoured all of Jack London’s books and stories about the Yukon, Klondike, and all things Canada and Alaska, when I should have been studying for my exams – all of them, over several years of school, high school, and university. When I put London to one side, it was only to pick up books about dogsled racing on the Iditarod and the Yukon Quest. Dreams of the North took me to Alta, Norway, where I worked as a sled dog kennel helper for the very first time, but it was at Slaven’s, as an emerging writer, that I sat in one of the places I had read about, without realising it. There, on the wall, was a Yukon Quest poster signed by the dog drivers, and I realised I had arrived, and that dreams, once again, can come true, albeit not quite how one imagined them.

The kids had fun too. Tiuri and Liva explored the cabin, the outhouses, the woods, the dredge. They panned for gold, got nailed by mosquitoes the size of small aircraft, and we talked about bears – good eatin’, apparently. Or was it the skins that were good? It didn’t matter. We were on an adventure, staying at a roadhouse built for the purpose.

Suzi and Lars chilled out too, although the sting of a Yellowjacket almost ended Suzi’s Yukon adventure. We had talked about bee stings back in Denmark, before the trip. We had not talked about wasps. Suzi was stung earlier in the trip, with no reaction, but these Yellowjackets – about twice the size of a “normal” wasp – well, it took her out of the game for a while. Once again, the Rangers were on the case. She couldn’t have been stung at a better location.

Jane and I enjoyed Slaven’s too, although Lars’ boots introduced a percussive element to the experience that we had not prepared for – damn big boots, mate! But the Roadhouse was a chance to spread out and dry out. We hung our gear on the same lines with the same pegs used by dog drivers. We sat at the same table, slept in the same beds, and lived the Alaskan life I had talked about on trips in Scotland, in our home in Greenland. This was everything Greenland was supposed to have been – that is, an Arctic environment, with trees!

Adventurous spines drive one to find adventure in far-out, remote, and exciting places. I sent a copy of The Ice Star to the Rangers in Eagle, Alaska, and hope they can wedge it alongside their gear to leave it on the bookshelf at Slaven’s. I found adventure there, in the wilds. The thought of a dog driver dipping into my book during a layover… well, that’s another dream come true.

The Container

Greenland Police Constable David Maratse makes his solo debut in a short story – Katabatic – set in the Arctic, very soon. But he’s going to be busy this Fall as he returns in a second short called Container.

So what’s the deal with all these Arctic Shorts? Well, Maratse and I have a deal, we need to get to know each other before he hits the crime scene with a vengeance in 2018. You see, Maratse and I have a plan: to put Greenland firmly on the crime map without translation – yes, Greenland crime written in English from the get go!

Curious to see how Maratse shapes up in the early days before he gets assigned to a more permanent post? You can find him in books one and two of The Greenland Trilogy, and in the above mentioned shorts.

You can find Container on Amazon here:

Amazon USA

Amazon UK

Amazon Australia

Amazon Canada

It’s Written in the Stars

It’s not all blood and guts, Arctic inspiration can lead to other stories too, though no less dramatic. In my first book for younger readers – aged 9 and up – I am going back to Alaska, as Jayla Cooper and her friends, Watson and Cherry, do their very best to save the world from The Starlighter.

It’s a race against time with plenty of obstacles in the shape of busy fathers, FBI Agents, scientists, politicians, and the President of the United States herself – no, not Clinton. But, ultimately, it is the story of a tough 12-year-old who just wants to be “useful” when her dad buries himself in his work to get over the loss of his wife, Jayla’s mother.

Enter The Starlighter, in the form of a strange alignment of stars in the night sky, and, all of a sudden, Jayla’s world is spinning to a frightening end. It’s up to Jayla to save the world, as she tries to reconnect with her father with a little help from the spirit of her mother.

Too fantastical for you?

I understand.

Fortunately, there’s plenty more action on the way at the end of the year in the third and final installment of The Greenland Trilogy, when Fenna returns in The Shaman’s House.

But, if you’re curious, The Starlighter will be available at a special pre-order price on Amazon.

Amazon USA

Amazon UK

Amazon Australia

Amazon Canada

Until then, there’s words to be written, drafts to be edited, and books to be published.

Time in Australia RIGHT NOW

Following The Ice Star down under, I find myself regularly asking Google what time it is in Australia “right now”. And right now, The Ice Star is moving up the charts for International Mystery and Crime on Amazon.

So, as a crazy thank you to the sudden boost in readers taking a chance on my book, I dug around for an Aussie song from my childhood… I was 10 at the time. Right now, well, I’m a little older.

Thanks again to Aussie readers! Have a great day/evening.