The Calendar Man – just in time for Christmas!

Once again, the paperback version of my pre-order book is available before the day of release, but this time it’s a good thing! If you’re curious about reading The Calendar Man as an advent calendar, and you prefer a physical copy, then if you order soon it should arrive in time for December 1st.

The Calendar Man is a dark advent story. It is set about twenty years into the future, just to make things interesting, but it is not science fiction. Without giving anything away, I should add that it features many of the characters from my Greenland crime books and thrillers, and refers to some upcoming stories, with no spoilers.

The very nature of an advent calendar story is that it should be read one day at a time. While The Calendar Man can be read in one sitting, I would urge you not to. It’s an advent after all.

The paperback version (English) of The Calendar Man can be found on Amazon:

US, UK, DE, FR, ES, IT, Canada, and Australia

The kindle version is still available for pre-order from Amazon

– currently at 0.99

Oh, and here’s the village Christmas tree from Qaanaaq, Greenland, 2010.

Iceland Noir

After what has to have been one of the wettest November weekends in Iceland – ever, I’m back in Denmark and trying to process what I experienced during four criminally exhausting fun-filled days at Iceland Noir.

I have to start with the Arctic Noir panel, as it was my first, and I was in such good hands. Moderated by Dr Noir herself, the forty-five minutes breezed by with laughs and loads of criminal insight into the works of Óskar Guðmundsson, Quentin Bates and Michael Ridpath – fantastic crime authors with gripping books set in Iceland. They are serious fun too! Mary Picken captured a fun moment during the panel – thanks!

There were tons of panels and it’s probably easier to check out the programme for Iceland Noir 2018 at the website to see what you missed. 😉 But the atmosphere and the chatting around the panels was even more interesting as I got to know authors whose work I have read and a ton of others that I must read.

The mystery tour was a mystery, and I believe Quentin might be responsible for the incredible amount of interest/fangirling that took place around a petrol pump! I’ve never really got into petrol pumps, and I’m not entirely sure it’s an Icelandic thing, but, you know … I have to read the book. 🙂

I think it’s easier to catch up on the Drunken Author’s Panel and the Fun Lovin’ Crime Writers via Iceland Noir’s Facebook page and Twitter feed. Suffice it to say, there’s a whole other side to crime writing that has to be seen and heard to be believed.

Ultimately, it was Iceland itself – the wind and the rain – that stole the show when we got to see it between the clouds. It reminded me of Greenland, and yet, not so much, although the rain in Nuuk and Reykjavík is pretty much the same in intensity.

Bottom line is, I have to go back! There’s too many good reasons and good people not to. Thanks to everyone for making Iceland Noir 2018 such a memorable event.

If Jack London wrote Arctic Crime Stories

Constable David Maratse debuted in The Ice Star, rocked the Scandinavian (Amazon) charts in Seven Graves, One Winter, but I really got to know him through his early adventures as a Police Constable in Greenland. Compared to Jack London stories by one Goodreads reader, Maratse’s short stories include themes that are current and relevant in Greenland, and are drawn from my own experiences when I lived and worked in remote towns, villages and settlements on the west coast and in the far north of Greenland.

These are very personal stories. They are fiction, but there is a lot of truth between the pages; some of it is difficult to think about, but important to remember. I used to blog (private for family only) about my time in Greenland – the good, the bad, and the out-of-this-world-once-in-a-million experiences. Shoveling my own experiences into Maratse’s past brings Greenland that bit closer, and allows me to explore the country, and revisit the people that shaped me during a very intense seven years.

At the same time, they are tons of fun to write, and I am very fond of Constable David Maratse. So, I am excited to say that there will be more short stories set in Greenland coming next year, 2019.

Here’s the reading order if you, like certain members of my family, are losing track:

  1. Katabatic
  2. Container
  3. Tupilaq
  4. The Last Flight
  5. The Heart that was a Wild Garden
  6. Qivittoq (2019)
  7. The Thunder Spirits (2019)
  8. Iluliaq (2019)

followed by the novels

  1. Seven Graves, One Winter
  2. Blood Floe
  3. We Shall Be Monsters
  4. Untitled WIP
  5. Untitled WIP
  6. Untitled WIP

Monster Paperback

This has taken an age, but The Greenland Trilogy is finally in paperback with a whopping 632 pages. #loveit

There are several polar bear sequences in the story, and it makes sense – for me – to link to another Nanook song about the polar bear, and a shaman taking on polar bear form. Greenland is rich with shamanic culture and tradition, so, naturally, book three my trilogy is called The Shaman’s House.

The Greenland Trilogy is available in paperback and ebook from Amazon USA, UK, Canada and Australia. You can find out more about Nanook on their Facebook page.